Tag Archives: In the future

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Taste

Within the next five years, a computer will help you make the perfect recipe — not too sweet, not too salty, not too crunchy, but just the way you like it.

By breaking down foods to the molecular level, computers will be able to use complex algorithms to determine what flavor combinations are the most appealing. They could then develop recipes that provide the ideal flavor and texture of food. Think of it as the Watson of Top Chef.

The technology could be used to help people eat better, IBM says. By making healthy foods taste better, people might crave vegetable dishes instead of sugary and fatty junk foods.

Though computers aren’t quite there yet, they are “tasting” things today. Specially designed microchips are being used in chemical and power plants to sense biohazards in the air. IBM researchers are working to adapt that technology to analyze the chemical structures in food.

 

 

IN THE FUTURE COMPUTERS WILL BE ABLE TO TOUCH, HEAR, SMELL, SEE, TASTE

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Smell

Do you think you’re coming down with a cold? In five years, you’ll be able to breathe into your smartphone to find out.

IBM researchers are developing technology to analyze odors in people’s breath that identify ailments, including liver and kidney disorders, asthma, diabetes and epilepsy. By determining which odors and molecules in a person’s breath are associated with each disease, computers of the future will be able to make an instant analysis for problems that today could be misdiagnosed or go undetected by a doctor.

Computers will also be able to detect harmful bacteria that cause Staph infections in hospitals just by smelling the surroundings.

In a more rudimentary form, computers are smelling things now: Agricultural sensors smell soil to determine crop conditions, sensors in museums determine which gas levels are ideal to preserve paintings, and city sanitation departments use computers that can smell garbage and pollution to alert workers when conditions are getting dangerous.

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MORE IN THE FUTURE

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Hear

Imagine holding a smartphone up to your infant when she’s making a sound, and the app displaying a message: “I’m hungry.” That’s not as far-off as you might think.

In five years, computers will be able to detect elements of sounds that humans can hear but aren’t able to understand. As every parent knows, the difference between normal babbling and a message that something is wrong can be extremely subtle. Computers of the near-future will not only be able to detect whether a baby is upset, they’ll be able to determine if the child is hungry, tired, hot or in pain.

By interpreting different sound pressures, vibrations and waves, computers will be able to predict when trees are about to fall, when landslides are imminent, or when cars are about to collide before humans can.

Computers are already starting to do this: In Galway Bay, Ireland, IBM researchers are capturing underwater noise levels to understand the impact that different sounds have on sea life.

<a href="http://money.cnn.com/gallery/technology/innovation/2012/12/17/ibm-5-in-5-computers-senses/4.